RCR radiology workforce census

Findings from the Clinical Radiology UK Workforce Census Report 2019 and 2019 infographic make for sobering reading.

As the report has been finalised and gone to press, the NHS has found itself battling a global pandemic, and pressured services are having to summon further reserves to manage the unprecedented challenge. The RCR workforce census data was returned before the escalation of coronavirus management, and underlines the precarious state of many of our imaging services.

Workforce shortages in clinical radiology are increasing year-on-year, resulting in delayed diagnoses for patients, and negatively impacting patient care.  Costs have escalated, as radiology departments struggle to meet the fast-growing demand for complex imaging, and consultant radiologists are feeling overworked and undervalued.

These powerful, but concerning, data are used by the RCR to lobby government, health education bodies, and policy-makers for increased training numbers and improved working practices for clinical radiologists. The data are also used by radiology services and other stakeholders for workforce planning and benchmarking purposes. We would like to thank all radiology Clinical Directors for participating in the 2019 census and ensuring robust data, with a 100% completion rate.  Thanks also to the Regional Chairs for supporting data collection.

The UK Workforce Census Report 2019 will be supplemented by individual devolved nations workforce census reports, available in June or July 2020.  These summary reports will provide details of the clinical radiology workforce situation in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales in 2019, focusing on regional variation and workforce forecasts over the next five years.

For queries or suggestions regarding census data, please email census@rcr.ac.uk.

 


Unreported X-rays, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations: results of the February 2016 snapshot survey of English NHS acute trusts

The latest snapshot survey, published in February 2016 by The Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) shows the number of patients in England waiting over a month for the result of CT or MRI scans to be around 230,000. The report of the results also outlines the human, societal and financial costs of this backlog.

Unreported X-rays, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations: results of the September 2015 snapshot survey of English NHS acute trusts

The snapshot survey in September 2015 by The Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) reveals that the number of patients in England waiting over a month for the result of CT or MRI scans has more than doubled since the College’s survey in February 2015. Survey responses were received from 83% of NHS Trusts in England

Unreported X-rays, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans: Results of a snapshot survey of English National Health Service (NHS) trusts

In February 2015, the RCR undertook a survey amongst NHS trusts in England to understand the full extent of reporting delays in radiology departments and how long patients are waiting for results of their X-rays and scans. This survey forms part of a larger area of work by the College in workforce planning and policy and is also important for reasons of clinical practice and patient safety.

Key findings from the survey reveal that a majority of NHS trusts had a backlog in unreported radiology studies, affecting around 300,000 patients who are waiting more than a month for results of their tests.